Jasmine's Dyslexia Education Fund

Jasmine’s Dyslexia Education Fund provides the funds needed for Jasmine to attend Hillside School in Boulder, Colorado. 

The Colorado school system has not properly addressed Jasmine’s dyslexia challenges, and she has hard work ahead of her to catch up. This education fund will be used towards a scholarship for dyslexia-focused education. 

 

Hillside School is a unique and powerful learning environment for children with learning differences such as dyslexia. The school has offered a partial scholarship and will do all it can to guide Jasmine’s learning journey, both financially and academically.  

 

Early intervention for dyslexia is crucial, but Jasmine did not have advocates in her corner. She changed schools six times while caring for her younger brothers and working multiple jobs to pay for transportation and general living costs. Jasmine fell through the cracks in the public school system. She is 18 years old, two years behind in high school, and wants more than anything to graduate. She has the self-discipline, energy, and determination; she is ready for the tools Hillside will provide. 

 

Jasmine thought “college would not work out for me”, but Hillside asked her to erase that thought; Hillside can help.

*All donations will go to support Jasmine's fund. All donations are tax deductible.

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About BVKID

BVKID emerged out of a pursuit to educate and support the community, and a desire for actions to speak louder than words. Established in 2017, we’re an organization driven by parents who support evidence-based measures for kids who learn differently. We are committed to building a strong foundation of support. Contact us to learn more and to get involved.

Our Mission

The mission of our parent group Boulder Valley Kids Identified with Dyslexia (BVKID) is to create a culture of innovation and to promote awareness of dyslexia among parents, teachers, and administration in Boulder Valley and to serve students with dyslexia and related learning disorders to ensure that they reach their maximum potential.

Our Objectives

#1

To ensure universal dyslexia/reading disability screenings for all kindergartners and any new students entering the district and to monitor their progress using scientific-based assessment tools that are quantifiable and objective.

#2

To ensure that a scientifically-based core reading program is implemented in grades K – 3rd, district-wide, which aligns with the National Reading Panel Report to include: Phonological Awareness, Phonics, Fluency, Vocabulary and Comprehension.

#3

To ensure that the intervention for dyslexic students at all grade levels is scientifically-based with attention to frequency, intensity, duration, and fidelity.

#4

To create an equitable pathway through high school, to provide access to all curriculum with peers of similar intellectual capacity, and to achieve similar graduation rates to the overall student population.

#5

To ensure that staff and administrators receive the best, most up-to-date professional development to empower them to feel confident in their ability to teach any child to read.

#6

To promote collaboration between parents and schools in BV to address and meet the needs of students identified with dyslexia and related learning disorders under state and federal laws.

Ways We Help

Meaningful Work. Unforgettable Experiences.

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Dad Lessons
Book of French Laws

Dyslexia Simulations

Learn what if feels like to be dyslexic

Barton Lending Library

Sharing resources with the community

Advocate

Advocate for evidence-based support for our kids who learn differently

“Dyslexic kids are creative, ‘outside-the-box’ thinkers. They have to be, because they don’t see or solve problems the same way other kids do. In school, unfortunately, they are sometimes written off as lazy, unmotivated, rude or even stupid. They aren’t. Making Percy dyslexic was my way of honoring the potential of all the kids I’ve known who have those conditions. It’s not a bad thing to be different. Sometimes, it’s the mark of being very, very talented.”

Rick Riordan

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